Media Processing - Video Compression

Convert video to a much smaller file size without losing quality.

 

Using Video Compression

To activate the video compression feature, first set your file and folder variables on the Media Processing tab.

When you have set the folders and filenames, select Video Compression from the Active Command drop-down list and click Run Command.

The compression view contains three settings designed to help you compress your video.

After setting the following values, click the Run Compression button to compress the video.

 

Frame Size

Multiple frame sizes are available, each labelled with the best suitability for the resulting video.

 

Name

Width

Height

Aspect

Description

Low Res

320

240

4:3

Old-style television ratio.

VGA

640

480

4:3

Old-style IBM PC-XT format.

HD 720

1280

720

16:9

720 vertical pixels.

HD 1080

1920

1080

16:9

1080 vertical pixels.

2K

2560

1440

16:9

~2000 horizontal pixels.

4K

3840

2160

16:9

~4000 horizontal pixels.

8K

7680

4320

16:9

~8000 horizontal pixels.

 

The default value is HD 1080. Either that setting or HD 720 should be suitable for most situations.

 

Frame Rate

In most cases, your original recording will run at a frame speed of about 30 frames per second (fps).

Simply by removing many of those frames, you can immediately reduce the size of your video file. For example, by setting this value to 15 fps from 30, your output file will be half the original size.

The trick on this setting is to remove only enough before you start noticing jittery motion. As a gauge, cinematic film in Hollywood is captured at 24 fps, a speed that is capable of full-scene action. At the other end of the spectrum, if your movie has no animated artifacts at all, just slide views that change every few seconds, you can probably get away with 4 fps or less.

 

Compression

The compression setting is an area where you can experiment to get the best results. In our experiences so far, a value of 28 appears to yield high quality while drastically reducing the output file size.

 

 

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